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Toro Y Moi – Anything In Return


Kika Jonsson January 8, 2013
Toro Y Moi Anything in Return1 Toro Y Moi   Anything In Return

TORO Y MOI Anything In Return

01. Harm in Change
02. Say That
03. So Many Details
04. Rose Quartz
05. Touch
06. Cola
07. Studies
08. High Living
09. Grown Up Calls
10. Cake
11. Day One
12. Never Matter
13. How’s It Wrong

Imagine TORO Y MOI as the musical equivalent of skin-tight leopard print pants, blue eyeshadow and fluorescent everything. TORO Y MOI is the stage name of Chazwick Bundick, a graphic design major from Columbia, South Carolina, the same state capital that brought you alt-Americana BAND OF HORSES and rapper YOUNG JEEZY. Sometimes associated the chillwave scene, TORO Y MOI’s music has more sexy undertones and cohesive rhythm than, let’s say, ARIEL PINK’S HAUNTED GRAFFITI. Think of your favorite lo-fi overlaid with a smooth R&B vocals, overdubs, and unexpected surprises like harpsichord samples. Pieces of seventies disco music mashed with a healthy dose of modern pop, synth and cheesy eighties soul and you are kind of close to what TORO Y MOI aims to seduce you with. Make no mistake, this new record is a shining addition to your make-out arsenal.

Bundick acknowledged the influence of his girlfriend’s musical taste (who apparently loves BEYONCE and THE DREAM) during the making of this album. Anything in Return is more pop-driven and confident than 2011’s Underneath the PineTORO Y MOI conceives of his music in actual albums (distinct in this day and age) and this dedication beyond a single is evident, Anything in Return has a definite beginning, middle and end, from the absolutely danceable opener Harm in Change to the so-wrong-it’s-right Studies, (which owes a lot to Shuggie Otis’ and the Isley Brothers) to the baby-what-I -done pleading How’s It Wrong.  You can hear more self-assuredness in the songwriting, he experiments more and also seems to enjoy better production options.  This a dance record, with well-defined beats and clubby overtones.

Rounding out the album is a glancing reference to living the stoney high life in High Living, and a nod to his former lonely guy life in Cake. On that note, his blog recently moved and the prelude stated “This blog was a big part of my life for awhile. I thought it was time for a change and I’m not really poor and lonely anymore, so…”  So if you want to hear the jump from “single musician ode to self” to “musician ode to getting laid regularly,” pick up Anything in Return and learn the definition of groove.

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TORO Y MOI

pop
from Columbia, USA

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